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June 2016
Volume 50, Issue 6

THE EDITOR'S CORNER

Restorative Materials in Orthodontics

ROBERT G. KEIM DDS, EdD, PhD

Like most senior orthodontists, I've attended hundreds of lectures on both orthodontics and dentistry as a whole. I have always taken a special personal interest in lectures involving interdisciplinary treatment - cases requiring the services of multiple specialists, with the restorative dentist finally establishing an optimum result. The late Dr. Vincent Kokich was perhaps my favorite speaker on this topic. Among his many professional and personal talents, he had an extraordinary ability to see the big picture in complex cases and to provide exemplary orthodontic care as part of a multidisciplinary team. In the last presentation I attended by Dr. Kokich before his untimely death in 2013, he opened with a statement that will always stick with me: that of all of the things he had accomplished in his professional life, he was most proud of having become a dentist. This probably explains why Vince was one of the best interdisciplinary orthodontists I have known.

339

Effectiveness of Composite Attachments in Controlling Upper-Molar Movement with Aligners

FRANCESCO GARINO MD, TOMMASO CASTROFLORIO DDS, PhD, SAM DAHER DDS, SERENA RAVERA DDS, GABRIELE ROSSINI DDS, GIOVANNI CUGLIARI MS, ANDREA DEREGIBUS MD, PhD

In nonextraction treatment, upper-molar distalization is often the method of choice to gain 2-3mm of arch space and obtain a Class I relationship. To achieve bodily movement, either the applied force must pass through the tooth’s center of resistance or a sophisticated equivalent system of forces and moments must be applied to the molar crown.

341

Esthetic Provisional Restoration after Space Closure in Patients with Missing Upper Lateral Incisors

JAN HOURFAR DMD, PATRIZIA LUCCHI DMD, DDS, BJÖRN LUDWIG DMD, MSD, CHARLES J. RUFF DMD, MARCO ROSA MD, DDS, DrOdont, GEORGIOS KANAVAKIS DDS, MS

Orthodontic space closure in a patient with a missing upper lateral incisor requires a mesial shift that will bring the canine and first premolar into esthetic focus. Additive or subtractive restorative measures such as odontoplasty or enamel reduction will then be needed to alter the visible tooth surfaces. Many cases require individualized adaptation of tooth shapes and colors.

348

Quad Helix Canine System for Forced Eruption of Impacted Upper Canines

MARIA ROSARIA RICCHIUTI DDS, PhD, MANUELA MUCEDERO DDS, PhD, PAOLA COZZA MD, DDS, MS

An impacted canine is one of the most difficult clinical problems for the orthodontist. Treatment requires close teamwork with the oral surgeon to gain access to the impacted tooth, followed by precis...

358

Mini-Implant-Supported Orthodontic Extrusion and Restorative Treatment of Fractured Teeth

NIVEDITA KINI MDS, SANTOSH KUMAR MDS, JATINDER MOHAN MDS, MOHAMMED SAAD SHAIKH MDS, DIVYA MAHESHWARI MDS

Traumatic fracture of anterior teeth can have both dental and psychological effects. A tooth fracture below the gingival attachment or alveolar bone crest also presents restorative problems. Failure to place the crown margins on sound tooth material may violate the biologic width and would therefore be considered a restorative failure.

368

BOOK REVIEWS

Orthodontic Radiographs: Guidelines for the Use of Radiographs in Clinical Orthodontics; Periodontology; Sinonasal Complications of Dental Disease and Treatment

JAE HYUN PARK DMD, MSD, MS, PhD

The latest edition of Orthodontic Radiographs has been updated to include a section on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Although this short guidebook was published by the British Orthodontic Society, most of its 16 concise, easy-to-read sections are applicable internationally.

373

TECHNIQUE CLINIC

Incisor Intrusion with a Miniscrew-Anchored Segmental Utility Arch

AMIT DAHIYA BDS, MDS, GURKEERAT SINGH BDS, MDS, MOrth

Nonsurgical options for correcting deep overbite generally involve incisor intrusion, molar extrusion, or a combination of the two. Segmental intrusion-arch mechanics for treating deep overbite, first described by Burstone, tend to produce side effects such as distal tipping and extrusion of the molars. This article describes a relatively simple, miniscrew-anchored segmental utility arch that can be used to achieve incisor intrusion without reciprocal forces.

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CASE REPORT

Correction of Complete Upper Canine-Premolar Transposition with Palatal Miniscrew Anchorage

LUIS PIEDADE DDS, MSc, PhD, ANDRE OLIVEIRA-SHAHINFAR, PATRÍCIA BITTENCOURT DUTRA DOS SANTOS DDS, MSc, PhD, FABIO HENRIQUE DE SA LEITAO PINHEIRO DDS, MSc, PhD

Transposed teeth, found in .3-.4% of the population, have been attributed to either genetic predisposition or a disturbance of eruption guidance. The maxillary arch is affected more frequently than the mandibular arch; the most common transpositions, in descending order, are canine-first premolar, canine-lateral incisor, canine in the site of the first molar, lateral incisor-central incisor, and canine in the site of the central incisor. In females, who are affected more often than males, transpositions occur more frequently on the left, whereas there is no side predilection in males. Associated dental anomalies include missing teeth, peg-shaped incisors, and supernumerary teeth.

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LETTERS

Correction of Class III Malocclusion with the Carriere Motion Appliance

I read with interest the article, "Nonsurgical Correction of Severe Skeletal Class III Malocclusion" (JCO, April 2016). I would like to congratulate Dr. Luis Carriere on this interesting article and o...

384

JCO Product News Published in June 2016

Click here to download a PDF of the Product News column for June 2016.See also the Online Product News page of our website for a searchable data base of published Product News items for the past sever...

389

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